International Women's Day

Article | Updated 3 months ago

The Western Australian Museum would like to acknowledge all the hardworking women who have greatly contributed to the Museum’s work. This includes staff, volunteers, associates and visitors, both past and present.

Below are a few of the amazing women who work for the WA Museum who help inspire people to explore and share their identity, culture, environment and sense of place, and contribute to the diversity and creativity of our world.

WA Museum History Curator – Emily Walsh

Emily Walsh

Emily Walsh
Image copyright WA Museum 

Emily was born in inner city Melbourne, and from an early age roamed the city exploring its wide range of exciting museums and galleries.

She completed an Arts/Science double degree at Melbourne University, majoring in Archaeology and History (Arts) and Geology (Science). Emily went on to complete an Honours Degree in Classics and Archaeology. She has volunteered on archaeological digs and worked in visitor services and as an exhibitions research officer at the Shrine of Remembrance. Emily is currently completing her Masters of Cultural Heritage.

Emily works as a Curator in the History Department, mostly working with the New Museum Project team on content development.

Senior Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisor – Deanne Fitzgerald

Deanne Fitzgerald

Deanne Fitzgerald
Image copyright WA Museum 

Deanne is a Yamatji/Nyoongar woman, growing up in York, Koolyanobbing and Dongara. After completing her Bachelor of Arts and then Honours Degree, Deanne worked for the Department of Aboriginal Affairs as well as the Department of Family and Children’s Services.

In her role at the Museum, she has made incredible contributions in managing the Museum’s Reconciliation Action Plan. Deanne also organises various NAIDOC Week events, helps the New Museum Project team to work and engage with Aboriginal communities and liases with the Museum’s Aboriginal Advisory Committee.

Deanne’s extensive work has allowed her to meet with and hear the stories of many Western Australian Aboriginal people. Her passion and support for open communication and active reconciliation are the foundations for building a better future for our State.

Senior Preparator, Exhibition and Design – Kirsten Tullis

Kirsten Tullis

Kirsten Tullis
Image copyright WA Museum 

Kirsten joined the WA Museum as a volunteer in 1981 after completing her Honours Degree in Biology at Murdoch University. Starting with the Birds and Reptiles Department, Kirsten was taught a wide range of taxidermy and preparation skills. By the end of the year she had secured a full time job as an assistant in the Display Department.

Throughout Kirsten’s career with the WA Museum she has progressed to become a specialist across many areas of preparation. This comes from Kirsten’s zeal for research and readiness to experiment with different materials and techniques.

Working with the Exhibition and Design department, Kirsten appreciates the diversity and creativity her job offers.

Head of the Department of Aquatic Zoology – Dr Jane Fromont

Dr Jane Fromont

Dr Jane Fromont
Image copyright WA Museum 

Jane clearly remembers her first scuba dive off a stunning beach in far northern New Zealand. This fueled her interest in marine biology.

After studying at The University of Auckland, Jane travelled across Asia before finding herself in Perth. It was during this time that she volunteered at the WA Museum researching Marine Invertebrates.

Wanting to add to her marine expertise, Jane returned to university and completed her PhD on the aquatic sponges of the Great Barrier Reef.

The WA Museum was fortunate to welcome Jane back in 1996. She continues to lead scientific research into Western Australia’s relatively unexplored and diverse marine environments.

WA Museum Hard Coral Taxonomist – Dr Zoe Richards

Dr Zoe Richards

Dr Zoe Richards
Image copyright WA Museum 

It wasn’t until Zoe learnt to scuba dive at the age of 16 that her passion for exploring really took off.

After completing her double degree in Marine Biology and Environmental Science at James Cook University, she took off on a protracted road trip around Australia. On her return she volunteered for Carden Wallace at the Museum of Tropical Queensland. Eventually, Zoe landed a job as her research assistant and says she was an incredible mentor.

Five years later Zoe started her PhD at James Cook University before moving to Sydney to complete a Chadwick Biodiversity Fellowship at the Australian Museum.

In 2012 Zoe took up her current contract research position in the Aquatic Zoology Department at the WA Museum. During her time working for the WA Museum she has fulfilled her dream of exploring the Kimberley marine wilderness area.